Worthy CEO Story

February 07, 2015

Worthy CEO Story

I follow the series of articles in The New York Times written by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant on women at work. As a woman in the workforce and for some time, they are always revealing and all too familiar. This past one was about how women help out a lot at work and yet do not get as much credit for it as men. In short, “Over and over, after giving identical help, a man was significantly more likely to be recommended for promotions, important projects, raises and bonuses. A woman had to help just to get the same rating as a man who didn’t help.” Painfully, women are expected to participate in “office housework.”  I could go on and on about having lived and watched what the authors talk about. And so could many women I know. [Honestly, less so where I work now.]

But the reason I wanted to mention something was this one story which seriously surprised me. And now I am an admirer.

“At a recent event we attended, 30 chief executives gathered around a dinner table for a conversation about closing the gender gap. With an even mix of men and women in the room, we expected the office housework to fall to a woman. But the one person who took notes the entire time was the founder of the Virgin Group, Richard Branson.”

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of corporate and CEO reputations.

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