Reputation of Blog Posts

August 23, 2015

Reputation of Blog Posts

Someone in my office sent me this information from Bulldog Reporter and I thought it was worth sharing here. The reason why is that sometimes I ask myself what’s a blog post worth and why do I keep at it. I am partially aware why I post – I use it as an archive for all the things that I care about having to do with reputation and I like sharing my expertise more widely. Also, I started blogging some 15 years ago when it was the only way I could have a voice in the field of reputation without resorting to the traditional media who tended to bypass people like me who worked in public relations. In fact, the other day I was telling someone how the news media used to assume that PR firms had no business producing its own research or thought leadership and could never be taken seriously. Luckily that is not the case today and not only are PR firms included in the “commentariat” or “chattering classes” but so are average citizens of all ages.

The article that was sent to me described the lifetime value of a blog post. It was done for IZEA and conducted by The Halverson Group. Imagine this — 555.7 million blog posts were written in 2014 on WordPress alone. Of course, many are abandoned in a few days or weeks but this is not small change.

Here is what they found. The lifespan of a blog post is almost 24 times what is typically accepted as 30 days. Intuitively, I knew this to be true but now have some hard data to attach to the fact that blog posts are essentially evergreen. “The study found that by day 700, a blog post will receive 99% of its total impressions. A 700-day lifespan indicates that blog posts, and by correlation things like content marketing, are an annuity that provides value over a significant timeframe.“ The researchers describe three stages of a blog post’s life cycle that includes 1. Shout (initial post where 50% of impressions are created within 7 to 10 days; 2. Echo (up to the 30th day where 72% of impressions occur); and 3. Reverberate (from day 30 to 700 where 28% of remaining impressions occur). So here it is. Blog posts have long shelf lives….many thanks to the Internet and search engines.

What does this have to do with reputation? Well, the reputation of blog posts are not appreciated nearly enough in my opinion. Blog posts are long-form content created by people with a point of view and by influencers or subject experts. They are enduring and everlasting and not ephemeral like most things today. Permanence can be a wonderful thing.

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of corporate and CEO reputations.

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