The Stumble Rate & My New Book Debut

January 29, 2008

The Stumble Rate & My New Book Debut

308celebration_salute2.jpgMy new book is out officially today (as I hinted last night).  It is titled Corporate Reputation: 12 Steps to Safeguarding and Recovering Reputation.
There is more information on a dedicated site — www.corporatereputation12steps.com. It is based on our discovery that the corporate reputation “stumble rate” continues to rise.  Over three-quarters (79 percent) of the world’s number-one most admired companies lost their crowns over the past five years in their respective industries. While reputation loss may now be inevitable, my new book offers a realistic roadmap to reputation recovery that can help any leader stabilize and regenerate a company’s most competitive asset.

It is pretty simple: recent corporate crises have demonstrated that a company’s reputation can be destroyed in seconds. A mishandled response, inappropriate act, product tampering, or poorly timed financial disclosure all have the power to instantly tarnish a respected reputation. As I see it, the well-managed and reputation-conscious company need not stand defenseless when faced with a damaged reputation.

Share this article: Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someone
Tags:
Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

6 Comments
  • Mike Spataro
    Posted at 05:11h, 31 January Reply

    Leslie,Congratulations on the new book. I look forward to reading it.

  • Glen Allsopp
    Posted at 15:22h, 01 February Reply

    Congrats on getting it out there. Are there any review copies available?

  • Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross
    Posted at 19:00h, 01 February Reply

    Thanks Mike. I mention Visible Technologies in the book. Hope you are well and thanks for the congrats! Appreciate the support. Best ,lgr

  • Chantale Carpenter
    Posted at 15:10h, 02 February Reply

    I am a Humber public relations certificate student in Toronto and we are discussing corporate reputation in our classes. In regards to international business, sometimes a Canadian organization must pay fees that may be considered bribes, but are part of doing business internationally. How do you suggest a PR person should handle this situation, be proactive and let the public know this is happening, or be reactive and wait for media questioning? When the media does find out, how to you suggest one answer their questions?

  • Bree Balchunas
    Posted at 13:18h, 05 February Reply

    Thank you Dr. Gaines-Ross. My company has embraced reputation management throughout the past two years, and I believe your book will continue to help us develop our reputation management plan. I look forward to getting it in the mail this week.

  • Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross
    Posted at 14:24h, 05 February Reply

    My advice is to stick to your schools or organizations code of conduct. Read it carefully and if there are suggestions about being paid to play, turn it down and notify your compamny’s compliance officer or legal officer. Thanks for the note. Best, lgr

Post A Comment