Reputation repentance

December 12, 2013

Reputation repentance

I have heard of an apology tour but not a contrition tour to repair reputation. While reading about the travails of JPMorgan which seem to be finally ending after a long period of fines and flashpoints, the article spoke of how the CEO, Jamie Dimon, had “embarked on a tour of contrition that featured Mr. Dimon holding town-hall-style meetings with regulators.” I can’t imagine anything more uncomfortable but teachable. This penance brought to mind a post I had just read by Jeff Stibel on LinkedIn about his company’s failure wall, a great successes he says.  One of his lessons about the failure wall that they instituted at his company where people write down how they have failed for all to see is that over time the failure fades. This lesson came to life because the Sharpie-written failure they post fades over time. Stibel wrote: “This physical property of the Failure Wall mimics how failure works in the mind: as long as you acknowledge failure, it slips away both in your own memory and in the memories of those around you. Unacknowledged, it tends to fester. Getting it out is the only way to go.” Contrition tours and failure walls probably lead to the same endpoint — showing vulnerability and learning to learn from it. Reputation repentance.

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

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