Reputation damaging close calls

December 08, 2013

Reputation damaging close calls

Always good practice to learn from crises or disasters. If they have to happen and tragedy occurs, at least we can try to apply lessons from them going forward. Crises, disasters or issues are sure to come to companies or organizations at one time or another. No one is immune — every company faces their 15 minutes of shame, not just their 15 minutes of fame.
The derailment of Metro-North Railroad in the Bronx one week ago today that killed four people and injured many is rightfully capturing a lot of attention on how to make trains safer.

I was reading this article about the derailment on my subway trip home Friday night and at its close, I came across this important best practice. “The railroad administration instructed the authority to adopt a confidential system to report ‘close call’ incidents.” Many companies could do a better job of understanding their close calls. Close calls are similar to “near misses” which are defined this way according to the National Safety Council:

A Near Miss is an unplanned event that did not result in injury, illness, or damage – but had the potential to do so. Only a fortunate break in the chain of events prevented an injury, fatality or damage; in other words, a miss that was nonetheless very near.

A faulty process or management system invariably is the root cause for the increased risk that leads to the near miss and should be the focus of improvement. Other familiar terms for these events are a “close call,” a “narrow escape,” or in the case of moving objects, “near collision” or a “near hit.”

If companies could include “close call” discussions on their internal monthly or quarterly calls, they’d be in far better shape to deal with disasters that do arise. Management could do better by discussing how they might handle near misses, how to make sure they do not happen, who else should be included in the discussion to prevent them and how to prepare should they actually happen. It could be an informal or formal hearing or process. A more formal best practice is sponsored by the American College of Physicians and the New York Chapter of the American College of Physicians — The Near Miss Registry. The online registry collects medical near misses before they actually occur with patients. The registry allows healthcare workers to voluntarily report medical “near miss” events” using a web based tool located at www.nearmiss.org  and hosted by NYACP.

Unfortunately the tendency is to bury the near misses in the hopes that they do not reach top management. However, that’s exactly the point. If top management does not know how close a call they missed, they won’t be able to prevent them.

I think it is a good step that Metro-North is adopting this process.

 

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

2 Comments
  • Ed Tobias
    Posted at 21:17h, 08 December Reply

    Several years ago NASA, in cooperation with the FAA, created the Aviation Safety Reporting System. It’s designed to identify aviation hazards using reports from pilots, controllers and others of near-misses and the like.The ASRS seems similar to the medical registry. A key to its success is that the reporting is voluntary and that those submitting reports are promised confidentiality and protection from any punitive action.

    As you say, it’s a good process to adopt. However,for it to really be successful it needs to be created within a framework of openness and trust similar to that of ASRS.

    • Leslie Gaines Ross
      Posted at 22:03h, 08 December Reply

      Thanks Ed. I did not know but I agree that it absolutely must be voluntary. Happy holidays! lgr

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