Reputation-Building for Women via the Podium

December 07, 2013

Reputation-Building for Women via the Podium

How do women build reputations that get them to the top? What’s the secret sauce or what’s the recipe for getting there? (Enjoyed using those cooking metaphors). On a near annual basis, we investigate top conferences for CEOs and other senior executives. For this year’s study, the firm examined speaking engagements, board memberships and honors of the most powerful women in business, based on Fortune’s 50 Most Powerful Women (MPW) U.S. list.
One of the ways to get to be a successful businessperson in the U.S. is by proactively connecting with external audiences.  We are finding that speaking engagements are increasingly important and we are not the only ones who have noticed. If you read this article that appeared on the booming conference business, you will agree that the podium is the new LIVE MEDIA channel.

In our research and as you can see in this infographic, we found that the majority of women (72%) on the list spoke at one or more conferences in 2012, and, on average, had 2.1 speaking engagements during the year. The leading speaking forums in 2012 for these most powerful women included Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Summit*, The Wall Street Journal’s Women in the Economy, MIT Sloan Women in Management, Catalyst Awards Dinner, Fortune Brainstorm TECH and the World Economic Forum in Davos. A categorization of all of the conferences found that, by far, these women spoke at more industry-focused events than other event types. (*Not every woman who makes Fortune’s Most Powerful Women in Business list has a speaking role at its annual conference.) 

Weber Shandwick’s research also shows that these executives are being acknowledged for their roles as leaders. On average, these female business leaders sat on 2.6 boards, the most prevalent type being industry/professional. Six in 10 women received an award or a place on a rankings or “best of” list. Of the honors bestowed upon the most powerful women in business, most (72 percent) were rankings compared to awards.

My colleague and friend Carol Ballock who runs our conference business had this to say: “Conferences, rankings and awards are essential for company storytelling. Women business leaders are leveraging these tools to communicate their companies’ messages and reinforce their company brands.”

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

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