My reputation as a passenger

February 16, 2015

My reputation as a passenger

I was on my way home late from work the other night when my Uber driver and I struck up a nice conversation. I was so pleased to find myself in a warm car when the temperature was so frigid and he was in the mood to tell me about how Uber rates its passengers. When my ride ended, he showed me that he was giving me the highest rating on a scale from 1 to 5.  I was surprised because he and I had some difficulties at the start figuring out exactly which corner I was on and his GPS had him circling around the block for two or three minutes.  I figured that this wrinkle had to be my fault and would sink my rating. As I recently read, “Customer reviews are a new form of credit report, one that measures comportment instead of finances.” I like the idea that how I comport myself as a passenger matters to my reputation because it makes us all more mindful about the men or women behind the wheel in the service business. Being mindful can go far in reminding us that there are other people in this world besides colleagues, clients, family and friends. Usually I sit in the back seat reading my New York Times or Wall Street Journal trying to catch up on the day and regain my equilibrium from a day in the office. Now that I understand that I am also being rated, I need to chill out, listen to some music and have a meaningful conversation with a stranger who might teach me a thing or two. I think it is only fair that reputation-rating goes both ways. 

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

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