First 100 Days Advice from the world of Sports

June 11, 2016

First 100 Days Advice from the world of Sports

Advice from the newly named president of the Harlem Globetrotters on the first 100 days. The writer of the article sums up the new president’s counsel saying that leaders must pivot forward to the next decade by focusing on “to be” goals and “to do” goals. Smith is saying: “The first asks: “What kind of organization do we want to be?” The second focuses on: “What do we do to deliver results?” Fairly simple and eminently useful.

Smith’s wise advice, however, got me thinking about the use of the word “pivot.” When did this word arrive on the scene and when will it go away? I actually started hearing it about three years ago and assumed it was a political term being adapted for corporate communications. I often heard it in conversations about getting a CEO or company to change the conversation. I try not to use “pivot” because it is a subtle way of telling others that they know a lot more about campaign strategy than you do. It has certainly been used a lot  lately with regard to the political campaign season we are barely living through. You can only imagine how glad I was to learn that I am not alone. I found this NPR article from Scott Simon and written just today complaining about pivot’s over-usage. What a relief since I can just link to what he says and I do not have to ramble on any further in criticizing it. He agrees with me that “…these words are often used to sound authoritative while being obscure.” I have to admit though that it is a great scrabble word.

 

 

Share this article: Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someone
Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

No Comments

Post A Comment