ReputationXchange http://www.reputationxchange.com CEO & Corporate Reputation Sat, 06 Feb 2016 22:21:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.7 Leadership lessons made easyhttp://www.reputationxchange.com/leadership-lessons-made-easy/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/leadership-lessons-made-easy/#comments Sat, 06 Feb 2016 22:21:18 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18100 I read a lot of leadership articles but this one made a whole lot of sense to me. It was written by Ron Carlucci of Navalent and is based on a longitudinal study of executives that isolated what it takes to be an exceptional top executive. The 10...

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I read a lot of leadership articles but this one made a whole lot of sense to me. It was written by Ron Carlucci of Navalent and is based on a longitudinal study of executives that isolated what it takes to be an exceptional top executive. The 10 year study comprising nearly 3,000 leadership interviews isolated the skills of best of breed using IBM’s Watson content analysis to arrive at four key dimensions. I was fascinated that Watson was able to take all this qualitative data and make sense of  all the nuances. Just yesterday I was in a meeting with a colleague who was wondering how best to analyze thousands of interviews he had just done for a client. This might just be an answer. But most importantly to me, the four dimensions of leadership are so exactly right, learnable and applicable:

1. They know the whole business. “Exceptional executives have deep knowledge of how the pieces of the organization fit together to create value and deliver results.” This is not easy to do but when you meet an executive who has the big picture and can connect the dots, it is astonishing to see how they put all the pieces of the puzzle together. It can be magical.

2. They are great decision-makers. “Exemplary executives have the ability to declare their views, engage others’ ideas, analyze data for insights, weigh alternatives, own the final call, and communicate the decision clearly.” The author mentions here that the exceptional leader is able to weigh intuition with analytics. I was glad to see this because sometimes gut reaction provides the deep insight that data masks. The article also cites a McKinsey survey that found that 60% of executives thought that bad decisions in their companies occurred as often as good ones. Only 28% said that good decisions were made often. That does not speak highly for the quality of good decision-making in companies today. Thus, if an executive at the top is able to sort out all the noise that comes with nailing down an important decision that impacts an organization’s strategic direction, that is exceptional.

3. They know the industry. “Their natural contextual intelligence lies at the intersection of insights into how their organization uniquely competes and makes money, and what is most relevant to the customers they serve ─ even when customers may not know themselves.” This description resonates because there is a lot of talk in my industry — public relations — about how we are morphing into other adjacent industries. I think you have to know what customers are actually thinking — not just what we believe internally — to be able to determine where the trajectory of public relations is headed.

4. They form deep, trusting relationships. “These executives form deep connections with superiors, peers, and direct reports, studying and meeting the needs of key stakeholders. They communicate in compelling ways and reach beyond superficial transactions to form mutually beneficial, trusting relationships.” This is where our research on leadership humility fits in. It’s about the collective, not the individual, and the best leaders live and learn by this principle. It sounds easy but it the character of the individual and where most leaders fail.

 

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America has an incivility problemhttp://www.reputationxchange.com/america-has-an-incivility-problem/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/america-has-an-incivility-problem/#comments Thu, 04 Feb 2016 13:30:12 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18096 [I posted this on LinkedIn and the response has been enormous. Thought I would share here too.] How did we get so mean, rude, coarse, and uncivil? How did we become so uncivilized?  It is no surprise to Americans that incivility and rudeness runs deep....

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[I posted this on LinkedIn and the response has been enormous. Thought I would share here too.]

How did we get so mean, rude, coarse, and uncivil? How did we become so uncivilized?  It is no surprise to Americans that incivility and rudeness runs deep. In a poll conducted from January 7 to 14th by Weber Shandwick and Powell Tatewith KRC Research, nearly all Americans (95%) say we have a civility problem. Three-quarters (74%) say civility has declined over the past few years and two-thirds (67%) say it’s a major problem. Indeed, 7 out of 10 Americans (70%) said that incivility has reached crisis levels. We’ve been asking Americans about civility since 2010. I hate to say it but something’s rotten in the unified states of America. Incivility is getting worse. We’ve got to do better.

Here are some of the findings from the newly released research:

Who me? Yes you. Couldn’t be. Then who? Americans tend to blame everyone but themselves and those close to them. Uncivil behavior, they say, is a problem that other Americans have. Ninety-four percent say that they themselves always or usually act politely and respectfully. Similarly, 72% say the same for people they know and 56% for people in their community. But beyond this select circle, beyond family members and friends, incivility magically becomes a problem. Only 20% of Americans think that other Americans always or usually behave civilly. Incivility is everyone else’s problem.

Who’s really to blame? Americans point fingers at the usual whipping boys. Politicians, the Internet/social media and the news media are deemed the top three sources of uncivil behavior and discourse – each being blamed by more than half of Americans. On the other hand, only 7% blame schoolteachers, a comforting conclusion since they are the ones who are educating our young ones and preparing the way for our next generation of citizens.

Why does it matter anyway? Why should we care about respect, politeness and tolerance? By sizable majorities, Americans believe that uncivil behavior has serious negative consequences: 77% say incivility in government is preventing action on important issues; 74% say the U.S. is losing stature as a civil nation; 75% say incivility makes it difficult to discuss controversial issues; 63% say they have stopped paying attention to political conversations and debates as a result of incivility; and 58% say incivility is deterring people from entering public service. Less than 4 in 10 Americans, 37%, believe that incivility is to be expected and is a natural and necessary part of the political process.

But it’s not personal…right? Hell no. Six in 10 Americans say that incivility leads to “a lot” of cyberbullying (63%), intimidation and threats (61%) and violent behavior (60%).  Apparently, one Tyler Clementi suicide is one too many for most Americans.

Will civility affect your vote come November? Apparently so.  Nearly all likely voters in our sample – 93% – say a candidate’s tone or level of civility are   important factors in deciding how they will cast their votes in the 2016 presidential election.  More than one half of all likely voters (51%) say that they had not voted for a candidate in the past because of uncivil behavior.

What about the presidential race so far? Polite or bullfight? Here is something upon which both Democrats and Republicans actually agree. By a fairly wide margin, both consider the current 2016 race to be more uncivil than civil.

Perhaps incivility is primarily a male leadership problem. Women would be better? Not really. When we asked whether a female president would raise the level of civility in society, 60% of Americans say it would make no difference. True, nearly one quarter of the population (26%) say a female would raise the civility level, while 14 percent say it would not. Women thus get a slight edge here but it is nothing to crow about.

One thing is clear about incivility in America. We can do better.

 

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Lists that Matterhttp://www.reputationxchange.com/lists-that-matter/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/lists-that-matter/#comments Sun, 31 Jan 2016 00:28:50 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18088 I made it onto this year’s 100 most influential people in business ethics list that Ethisphere awards annually. As Ethisphere says, they select people for “their material impact in the world of business ethics and compliance.” I am on the list under the category of Corporate Culture which is where my...

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I made it onto this year’s 100 most influential people in business ethics list that Ethisphere awards annually. As Ethisphere says, they select people for “their material impact in the world of business ethics and compliance.” I am on the list under the category of Corporate Culture which is where my work on building and protecting reputation must fall. As I always say when it comes to lists, any list that has Pope Francis on it is an honor. He makes it on the list under Thought Leadership which is another way of saying that he provides leading thoughts. Some of the other individuals are pretty impressive too and way out of my league in their contributions to making the business world as good as it can be — Richard Branson, Warren Buffett, Tim Cook, Elon Musk, the Zuckerbergs, Sallie Krawcheck and on and on. My rank falls closer to the bottom but hey, I could not be more excited and proud of making a contribution to raising the bar on corporate behavior. And proud that I work for Weber Shandwick, such a fine company, that allows me to do what I do every day.

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A View from the CEO Worldhttp://www.reputationxchange.com/a-view-from-the-ceo-world/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/a-view-from-the-ceo-world/#comments Mon, 25 Jan 2016 20:20:24 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18074 Social purpose has become fully ingrained in business. A new 2016 report (this is their 19th) from PwC among 1,409 CEOs in 83 countries was unveiled at Davos and found that 76% of CEOs define business success by more than the bottom line, 69% link their company’s purpose...

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Social purpose has become fully ingrained in business. A new 2016 report (this is their 19th) from PwC among 1,409 CEOs in 83 countries was unveiled at Davos and found that 76% of CEOs define business success by more than the bottom line, 69% link their company’s purpose to their constituents’ needs and not surprisingly, 66% are witnessing more threats today (probably from some of these newer constituents). They regard customers at the top of their list in terms of who they are creating value for but plenty of others considered important such as government/regulators, industry peers, employees, supply chain partners and investors.

I always read the daily CEO report from Alan Murray at Fortune and he had this to say about profit and purpose and a roundtable conversation with CEOs from multinationals:

“The single table conversation covered the need to put purpose as well as profit at the center of a company’s strategy; the importance of transparency in an age of social media; the value of engaged employees in spreading a company’s story; and the need to build customer trust one person at a time. The comments were off the record, so I can’t report them in detail. But I can say the thoughtful conversation left me feeling more hopeful about the future than anything I’ve heard from Iowa or New Hampshire in recent weeks. The focus of business leadership has changed in the last decade, and even if that’s out of necessity, it’s a good thing.”

Moving on, when asked about the areas where they are making “significant” changes to respond to this wider societal and stakeholder demand, the top three areas cited are technology, risk management and interestingly, “how we manage our brand, marketing and communications.” A large 92% of CEOs said they are working on doing a better job at marketing communications, with nearly half (48%) saying they are making significant changes in this area.

Due to my profession, I was impressed that PwC had an entire section on measuring and communicating success. As the report says, “…it makes sense that leaders want to make sure that their organisation is very clear on what they stand for, and their distinctive advantage. We think this is why purpose/values (59%) and business strategy (54%) are the top-two areas that CEOs want to better communicate” Engagement and transparency are key factors in how companies are being evaluated today on the softer side of the ledger. These are important criteria to new recruits and to keeping top talent. Companies can no longer hide the bad news and claim to be one thing externally and yet be entirely different internally. CEOs are wise to focus on insuring consistency in their communications and being transparent above all else.

 

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Reputation of a Noble (Nobel) Prizehttp://www.reputationxchange.com/reputation-of-a-noble-nobel-prize/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/reputation-of-a-noble-nobel-prize/#comments Sun, 24 Jan 2016 22:26:02 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18059 “For reputation is a funny thing. Scandal can destroy it overnight, of course, and the foundation’s trustees might fairly argue that their cautious approach has avoided that fate. But reputation can also slip away, unnoticed, as the world’s attention shifts elsewhere.” This was a closing...

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“For reputation is a funny thing. Scandal can destroy it overnight, of course, and the foundation’s trustees might fairly argue that their cautious approach has avoided that fate. But reputation can also slip away, unnoticed, as the world’s attention shifts elsewhere.”

This was a closing quote in an article about the eroding reputation of The Nobel Prize. First, there is the fact that the prize money is not as much as some other prizes (i.e. Breakthrough) and there are questions being raised about its long-term financial viability and image. To combat the slow slide, the CEO Lars Heikenstein is elevating the prize’s worthiness by jumping into social media, conferences, concerts and debates, among other things. There is also concern about the relevance of some of the Nobel’s category awards and how competitors are marching into the 21st century with categories such as neuroscience and nanoscience.

The main issue raised by the article struck me as one that many companies face. Organizations may sometimes play it too safe in balancing reputation and risk and in some instances, they may need to push the envelope or risk falling off the cliff into oblivion. It sounds as if Heikenstein is making strides but this is a good early warning for many companies and organizations who resist not changing with the times.

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CEO advicehttp://www.reputationxchange.com/ceo-advice/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/ceo-advice/#comments Sat, 23 Jan 2016 19:31:31 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18049 Read this earlier in the week in Fortune Geoff Colvin’s Power Sheet newsletter about tips for CEO Succession. One of the pieces of advice was to ground oneself and keep humble. Colvin told this anecdote that I think has a nice turn of words. “I once asked...

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Read this earlier in the week in Fortune Geoff Colvin’s Power Sheet newsletter about tips for CEO Succession. One of the pieces of advice was to ground oneself and keep humble. Colvin told this anecdote that I think has a nice turn of words. “I once asked former Honeywell CEO and former General Electric vice chairman Larry Bossidy how he could tell when rising leaders weren’t going to make it. He answered, “They don’t grow. They swell.” Great advice.

 

 

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Humble leadership workshttp://www.reputationxchange.com/humble-leadership-works/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/humble-leadership-works/#comments Mon, 18 Jan 2016 21:23:52 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18035 Paul Holmes sent out this roundup on corporate reputation trends for 2016 which includes our research on the importance of managing your company’s CEO reputation premium. It cites our research on one of our key findings which was about the emergence of the humble CEO this year....

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Paul Holmes sent out this roundup on corporate reputation trends for 2016 which includes our research on the importance of managing your company’s CEO reputation premium. It cites our research on one of our key findings which was about the emergence of the humble CEO this year. Humble CEOs were more likely to be highly regarded by managers and up than less humble CEOs. Seeing the roundup reminded me again of this chart that I screen-shot last week. I found it in an article on the year’s management trend charts for 2015 from HBR. I highly recommend the charts. The chart I chose and which I previewed at the top of this post shows that those leaders that rate themselves highly effective (perhaps a bit boastful) are also the least highly ranked as effective by their 360 degree raters. Definitely a disconnect. Similarly, those leaders who do not rate themselves as the most effective (and probably find themselves more in the humble-pie camp) are rated as good leadership models. Not a perfect correlation but the chart helps to make the argument like we found in our research that if you believe leadership is never perfected and you are modest about your accomplishments, you are probably serving as a good role model for those around you.

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Small and Mid-Cap Company Reputationhttp://www.reputationxchange.com/small-and-mid-cap-company-reputation/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/small-and-mid-cap-company-reputation/#comments Sat, 16 Jan 2016 18:52:43 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18026 Always enjoy finding some new data on the value of corporate reputation among different subsets of companies. Small and mid-cap companies believe that 28% of their value is attributable to reputation. Thus, the total value of corporate reputation for all UK listed companies could be...

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Always enjoy finding some new data on the value of corporate reputation among different subsets of companies. Small and mid-cap companies believe that 28% of their value is attributable to reputation. Thus, the total value of corporate reputation for all UK listed companies could be nearly £1.7 trillion. The research was conducted by BDO LLP and the Quoted Companies Alliance and conducted by YouGov. Other interesting stats:

  • 79% believe that corporate reputation is very important
  • The person primarily responsible for a company’s corporate reputation is the CEO (34%), followed by the board (32%) and executive management team (21%).
  • The people that companies turn to for advice on corporate reputation are PR/Communications professionals (46%), brokers/NOMAD (37%) and then lawyers (13%).
  • Greatest threats to reputation are rumors in traditional media (21%), cybersecurity (18%), rumors on the Internet (17%) and fraud (12%). Interesting that hearsay in traditional media leads those on the Internet.

And in case you were wondering, 74% of companies say they are prepared to a reputational crisis and 26% are not doing much.  That is better than I expected. They might be taking extra precautions because companies report that they are most concerned that rumors are likely to affect share price (90%), investor confidence (88%) and employee morale (82%).  As well, there is the recognition by 60% of companies that reputational issues affect other companies negatively and no one wants fingers pointed at them.

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CEOs and their Droneshttp://www.reputationxchange.com/ceos-and-their-drones/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/ceos-and-their-drones/#comments Sun, 10 Jan 2016 22:14:48 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18014 Last night I read an article about the Kemp Forum on Expanding Opportunity in South Carolina where six Republicans running for the presidential nomination appeared. It mentioned that Republican Carly Fiorina was absent because she had missed her flight. I don’t recall the last time I had read something like that...

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Last night I read an article about the Kemp Forum on Expanding Opportunity in South Carolina where six Republicans running for the presidential nomination appeared. It mentioned that Republican Carly Fiorina was absent because she had missed her flight. I don’t recall the last time I had read something like that but I am sure that it happens.

Someone is working on fixing this problem. According to an announcement at CES, Chinese company Ehang has developed a single-seat, self-driving drone copter operated by a tablet. You just get in and type in your destination in Google maps and there you have it. It runs on batteries that will keep you in the air for 23 minutes so hopefully you won’t be all that far away. Carly or any other missing-in-action candidates or CEOs stuck in traffic can buy one for $200,000 to $300,000 later this year. Of course, the red tape on flying such a thing will be vicious.

 

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The wonders of praisehttp://www.reputationxchange.com/the-wonders-of-praise/ http://www.reputationxchange.com/the-wonders-of-praise/#comments Sat, 09 Jan 2016 19:21:23 +0000 http://www.reputationxchange.com/?p=18001 In all the holiday and end of year celebrations, it was probably easy to miss this post from HBR on the best management charts in 2015. They are terrific and it has something for everyone. But this one above followed a chart that I actually posted...

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In all the holiday and end of year celebrations, it was probably easy to miss this post from HBR on the best management charts in 2015. They are terrific and it has something for everyone. But this one above followed a chart that I actually posted about a while back on employees saying the top communications challenge they face with management is the lack of recognition for achievement. Here is the chart again below in case you missed it.

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 10.53.07 AM

The one in the header of this post simply shows how effective praise is tied directly to employees’ stated satisfaction with their jobs. Why don’t they teach this in business school?

 

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