Defending Reputation via Social Media Guidelines

September 13, 2011

Defending Reputation via Social Media Guidelines

When I was researching and writing an article  on safeguarding your digital reputation for the Wall Street Journal Europe’s website this week, I found this interesting article on how the International Olympic Comittee (IOC) had issued social media guidelines for “athletes and other accredited persons” for the 2012 games. Now we all know that many companies and organizations have such guidelines, but this was different in that the IOC made it clear it would be monitoring online content and would withdraw accreditation “without notice, at the discretion of the IOC, for purposes of ensuring compliance with these Guidelines.”  That will surely keep athletes and any other accredited individuals from using social media for commercial purposes and harming the reputation of the games and committee. At first I thought this was a bit harsh but on second thought, many companies and organizations monitor what employees are saying but don’t outright admit it. Sounds like the IOC is being very transparent about keeping its reputation clear.
I only wish they had defined “accredited” persons.  They have a definition of terms at the end of the guidelines but do not define what it exactly means. I assume they mean third-parties but I did not have much luck online figuring it out either. Does that mean only third-parties must follow the social policies set forth? What about fourth or fifth parties — meaning four or five degrees of separation away from the first and second parties? I guess I am getting too technical and asking too many questions. But I think it would help to know if a vendor or supplier is an accredited person of interest!

Anyhow, please read my article on digital defense and the five essential tips to safeguarding your reputation.

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

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