Civility at work and at home

August 29, 2013

Civility at work and at home

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I was very pleased when I saw that the WSJ covered our thought leadership survey Civility in America yesterday (mid day it was the 4th most popular on the site!). In their article on incivility at work, they mentioned our stat that one in four Americans (26%) have quit their job due to the unpleasantry and rudeness they have encountered at work.The rate of Americans who have quit a job because it was an uncivil workplace decreases with age. Interesting, right? This could be that younger people are less tolerant to incivility at work or that it is more acceptable in today’s society to quit a job.

There is no doubt about the fact that incivility is seeping into all aspects of our lives. According to our research with Powell Tate and KRC Research, the rise in uncivil workplaces has risen over the past 12 months, from 34% to 37%. This might be part of the reason that 75% of Americans think we should have civility training in schools today. What could be a better place to start. You might say a good place to start would be at home. Maybe so but the survey found that 30% of Americans say they experience incivility at home and 55% see it in their neighbors’ homes. Nothing like fingerpointing.

One of the questions we asked this year still intrigues me when it comes to this timely topic. We asked people in late Spring when we did the survey whether they would take a national civility pledge on July 4th.  Well, a whopping 87% said they would. There was no disagreement here — men, women, all age and income groups and regions of the country were willing to spend an entire day being just plain civil. My sense is that the same high percentage would apply to this upcoming Labor Day. I am going to do my best as a party of one to be as civil as I can be, even if it surprises someone. All of our reputations in this country depend on it.

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Leslie Gaines-Ross
Leslie Gaines-Ross
lesliegainesross@gmail.com

As Weber Shandwick’s Chief Reputation Strategist, I focus on the ever changing world of reputation. For the past 25 years, I have relentlessly observed, researched and commented on the rise and fall of reputations.

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