Quotes for the Day

I found this article in my Google alert and thought it was very well written and thoughtful on the topic of reputation. Hard to find thoughtful pieces these days when everyone is in a mad rush. Just yesterday at lunch I was talking to several others about content fatigue which seems to be the malady of the season. Below is a good description of reputation from the author of the article, Bong Osorio. I recall someone, perhaps Warren Buffett, saying something similar about trust, "Trust is like the air you breathe. When it's present, nobody really notices. But when it's absent, everybody notices." Quote below:

"Reputation is like the weather. It exists, irrespective of whether you measure its effects. It dictates what activities and goals are realistic, and how you should package and present yourself to be believable, strong and supportable. It is prudent to check the weather before you go out, and even more helpful if you know how it is changing. So it is with reputation. The main disparity between the two is that while you cannot control the weather, you can design the course of your reputation. And that is a clear case for managing it."

Holiday reputation of retailers needs protecting

Some new research just came out from Toluna Research for web.com about consumer perceptions of big and small retailers this holiday season. Because of the recent spate of big retailer security breaches, consumers are expressing great concern. 

  • 69% are concerned about security when shopping online this season
  • 25% are likely to change their online shopping behavior
  • twice as many consumers (27% vs. 12%, respectively) are concerned about online security at large retailers than small retailers

The big box retailers' reputations will clearly feel the heat this season if consumers are concerned about their security privacy. To keep their reputations intact, they will need to reassure consumers that their credit history and information is iron-clad. Communications will be key to getting shoppers back into the stores and online with confidence. Information about what they are doing to protect consumers, such as special chips in their cards, and beefed up security technology can help. Additionally, communicating from the CEO on down about consumer concerns and acknowledgement that they are aware of a confidence gap in shopping would be beneficial. Having the senior executive team visibly active during the holiday season at the stores or online using social media might send the right message that they are on alert. Perhaps having senior executives shop in the stores for their holiday gifts and video-ing the transactions could help send a "trust" message. Training all employees about how to answer shoppers' questions about cyber breaches is important. In addition, employees need to know that they should not give out their passwords under any circumstances and the same with vendors since this is such a high security risk and easy way to get into retailer systems. One of the things I learned when working on our Employees Rising study was that one of the reasons that companies train their employees in the use of social media is to educate them about not giving out passwords because it only enables cyber thiefs to do ill.

Reputation is everyone's job during the holiday season and making that loud and clear this year will help. Let's wish for a non-cyber-hacking holiday in 2014.

Saving your reputation

I am always looking for quotes and just found two today. They appeared in an article in The Guardian about how charities or non-profits can manage crises. Here they are:

"The 17th century bishop Joseph Hall shrewdly noted that 'a reputation once broken may be repaired, but the world will always keep their eyes on where the cracks were.'"

"Brand is a promise to your stakeholders. It embodies what you want them to believe about you. Reputation, on the other hand, belongs to them. In short: brand is how you talk to the world, reputation is how the world hears you."  Vicky Browning, director of CharityComms

The article was based on a panel held in London and the key advice about managing a media crisis for charities who are caught up in the public glare when crisis strikes:

  1. Understand your risks
  2. Respond proportionally to the intensity of the crisis
  3. Be prepared
  4. Know what you can control and what you can't 
  5. Monitor and measure perceptions
  6. Become the expert and authoritative source on the issue 
  7. Respond quickly and with sensitivity (empathy!)
  8. Involve your employees, keep them informed
  9. Invest in reputation before you need it
  10. Stick to your messages

These reputation remedies could apply to any crisis -- be it a for-profit or non-profit. The one that struck me as an interesting nuance which I had not thought about in a while was reacting in proportion to the crisis event. Sometimes just a statement on a website will suffice whereas sometimes the CEO needs to call a press conference and provide regular updates. Knowing when the CEO should visit the site of a crisis and when not to requires good judgement and good counsel from crisis experts. Over-reaction can intensify a problem.

The nature of the response reminds me of an incident that occurred this week. Chairman Rupert Murdoch of 21st Century Fox made an $80 billion takeover bid for Time Warner and Time Warner's CEO Jeffrey Bewkes responded. Instead of a media statement, no comment, CEO email or other response, he chose to produce a three minute video directed at his employees using the medium that the company has excelled in during the past few years -- digital media. The video begins with “Hi everyone. I wanted to speak directly to you about the news you’ve been hearing today about our company.” Short and simple and appropriate to the situation. Here's an example of taking control of what you can when your company is in the public eye. Bewkes got his points across, took little time out of employees and other stakeholders' time and was personal, conversational and direct. In a way, he discounted (dissed?) the takeover bid by appearing on the small screen. Good choice. 


Reputation lessons from space

For those of you interested in crisis, this article on the tragic Challenger and Columbia space shuttles is a reminder of how things can easily go wrong. Even for the best and most revered of organizations. NASA’s reputation never truly recovered from these failures.  We have come to learn, even from pre-Internet days, that the tiniest link or problem can cause the greatest of catastrophes. The article cited the theory of  “normalization of deviance “ from Diane Vaughan, a sociologist, who was on the commission investigating the 2003 Columbia disaster. When I was writing my book on reputation recovery, I read many of her articles about the 1986 Challenger disaster and how some risks became accepted as part of how business gets done. People just get used to or should I say immune to risk-taking.  Vaughan uses the example from the Challenger where the O rings’ erosion had been known on earlier launches of spacecraft and simply became routine, hence the normalization of deviance. As Vaughan says, “They applied all the usual rules in a situation where the usual rules didn’t apply.”

The challenge for companies is figuring out how to not become immune to the everyday risks that go with doing certain jobs such as in manufacturing, food and beverages, pharmaceuticals, automotive, mining, oil, just about everything if you start listing them out like I am doing. This brought to mind what it must be like working on oil rigs and how the risks to safety are there each and every day. How the most minor short cut turn on a dime to be the final blow. How do companies train their employees to not take minor glitches for granted – lives and reputations could be at stake if they ever so slightly deviate.  Another question to ask is how do companies make sure that they listen hard to grumblings from employees? Maybe there is a kernel of truth to be had. Perhaps companies need a Bad News Officer who is Mr or Ms Gloom and Doom. That person could be responsible for bringing all the bad news that no one wants to hear or tell and put it on display for leaders to cope with. The hard truth might be tough to hear but the least expensive way to run a company, maybe even save lives.

 

Compliments for reputation-building

There are many ways to rebuild reputation but one way that companies might consider when recovering from a crisis is developing a Compliments page where employees and non-employees can anonymously thank those front line or other employees for doing their jobs well and conscientiously. I spoke to a company a short while ago as they were dealing with a reputation crisis and suggested that they start a Compliments page where community members could thank those front line people they encounter frequently for doing a honest day's work. It could help. Of course, the site would attract uncivil types but there must be a way to delete them if they stray too far from the site's purpose and goals.

Some universities have being doing this for a while. It started at Queen's University in Ontario because the founders wanted to find a way to counteract bullying. University of Pennsylvania has a Compliments Facebook page as does Penn State. On the U of P site, people thank others for returning their lost wallet, for the sense of accomplishment they feel after doing nonprofit work, to a capella group for their beautiful sound and send support to a fellow classmate struggling with pain. The U of P Compliments page has the goal of "learning to do good and spread good." Penn State's site says that it is a social project to spread happiness.

Compliments pages are a wonderful idea considering that incivility that can sometimes surround and engulf us. In Weber Shandwick's Civility in America 2013 study, we found that 70 percent of Americans believe incivility has reached crisis proportions. With Americans encountering incivility more than twice a day on average (2.4 times per day), and 43 percent expecting to experience incivility in the next 24 hours, dealing with incivility has become a way of life for many. Maybe it is time to turn this tide of negativity.

Compliment sites can be contagious and make people feel good despite their company's blemished reputation. It could give an employee that extra boost they need to be productive and positive when they find everything uncertain. Hearing a compliment might keep an employee loyal to his or her company and make them feel they are doing their part in getting their company's reputation back on its feet. Companies might consider trying this and seeing what happens. Reputations get repaired in the oddest ways.

Politicizing reputation

starbucks-appreciation-day  

 

 

 

One of the trends I talk about when it comes to reputation is how politics is no longer a strange bedfellow to companies.  Companies and their leaders now find themselves taking sides on climate change, same-sex marriage, immigration, gun control and a host of other issues. Company reputation is far more politicized that it used to be. Years ago when I first got into public relations, it was made very clear to me that companies did not air their political leanings or take sides on political issues. Today, political issues are now the business of business.

That is why I was particularly interested in an article about a Starbucks in Newton Connecticut.  I copied and pasted the newspaper photograph into a powerpoint slide for safekeeping. I'll want to be able to remind myself when I need a good example of how politicized reputation has become and how tricky it is to walk a fine line.

Nothing is ever simple these days when companies live in glass houses. There's always two sides to every coin. Here's a snapshot of what happened. Two days ago, gunowners declared Friday "Starbucks Appreciation Day." Unfortunately, this nationwide Appreciation Day was also being celebrated at a Starbucks in Newton, Connecticut, home to the mass killing of some two dozen children and teachers. Why appreciation day for Starbucks? Reason is that Starbucks has publically supported the Second Amendment in states where it is allowed and which grants people the right to keep and bear arms whether those guns are carried in public spaces such as the ubiquitous coffee chain or not.  However, because of the glaring sensitivities surrounding the hideous Sandy Hook killings, Starbucks found themselves at ground zero for pro- and anti-gun supporters even though gun carrying is allowed in Connecticut.

What did they do? At the Newton Starbucks, they closed the store five hours early and put up this sign:

Dear Customers,

At Starbucks we are proud that our stores serve as gathering places for thousands of communities across the country and we appreciate that our customers share diverse points of view on issues that matter to them. We also believe in being sensitive to each community we serve.

Today, advocacy groups from different sides of the open carry debate announced plans to visit our Newtown, Connecticut store to bring attention to their points of view. We recognize that there is significant and genuine passion surrounding this topic, however out of respect for Newtown and everything the community has been through we decided to close our store early before the event started. Starbucks did not endorse or sponsor the event. We continue to encourage customers and advocacy groups from all sides of the debate to contact their elected officials, who make the open carry laws that our company follows. Our long-standing approach to this topic has been to comply with local laws and statutes in the communities we serve.

Thank you for your understanding and respect for the Newtown community.

Sincerely,

Chris Carr

executive vice president, U.S. Retail

For Starbucks, there's no winning on this issue but I respect the fact that they behaved according to their conscience and in line with their corporate character . I also was impressed that the EVP of US Retail signed his name to the letter. There was no darting the issues. However, I think it is important to recognize that company reputations will find themselves regularly tangling with political issues and they need to shape their reputations with that in mind.

Toronto Musings

201Had a terrific visit to Weber Shandwick Toronto this week. My colleagues hosted a breakfast to discuss the new rules of engagement for employee engagement and reputation and I shared the platform with my colleague Kate. We met some terrific clients and had some very good questions afterwards, always a plus. Reputation and employee engagement are very much intertwined which made the two angles so easily compatible. We also met with some clients and had meaningful discussions about leadership, character and reputation. Afterwards I headed up to Muskoka for a conference among hydro distributors to talk about safeguarding reputation. Terrific conference put on by The MEARIE Group and to prepare, I learned alot about the challenges facing electricity distributors in Ontario. Of course, it was hard not to mention how Mayor Rob Ford of Toronto was negatively impacting the city's reputation. On the day of the conference, the Mayor of Montreal resigned after being arrested. At the breakfast meeting, I learned something that I aim to keep for posterity. Most probably, I will add it to our compendium on how to recover from a crisis. We have a master deck on how companies recover and build even better reputations and for me, it's my team's Bible. We catalogue all the recovery strategies we can because it always comes in helpful for the next client. But sometimes people have a way of saying something that just lights up your brain waves because it is so insightful and speaks so directly to a company's character. This Canadian company had a crisis some years ago and one year later to the day, they ran full page ads reminding people of what happened and what they had done since the fateful event. The head of comms said to us while we were chatting at the breakfast that they ran the ad because..." "We will be the first to remember, not the first to forget." The company wholeheartedly owned the crisis and was not going to forget. Sage advice.

Reputation-driven bonuses

bonusHow is this for a headline from Bloomberg: Goldman Sachs Links Bonuses to Protecting Firm Reputation. I like it. Apparently Goldman Sachs is reviewing employees’ efforts annually to protect its reputation and build back clients’ trust. Makes total sense to me as a reputation observer.

In May, the company issued a report titled the “Business Standards Committee Impact Report” which laid out 39 recommendations. The report says it was the most extensive review of  the firm's business standards in its 144 years.  The CEO, Lloyd Blankfein, led 23 three-hour sessions in 2011 and 2012 with partners and managing directors on personal accountability and included a case study about communications within the firm and with clients, according to the report. It  represented "tens  of  thousands  of  hours  of  discussion,  analysis,  planning,  execution,  and,  importantly, training and professional development which, alone, totaled approximately 100,000 hours.  The BSC held 17  formal committee meetings.   The Board Committee overseeing  the BSC met 13 times.  The  BSC  Implementation  Oversight  Group  held  11  meetings  and  made  five presentations to the Board of Directors.  It also met three times with a separate subcommittee of the  Board’s  Corporate  Governance  and  Nominating  Committee  which  provided  ongoing oversight of the BSC implementation." They also identified three themes that reached across all the recommendations and one of them was "reputational sensitivity and awareness and its importance in everything we do."

Because I regularly report on how companies recover from reputaional loss, I thought it was important to readers to hear about how one company was finding its way after its reputation was hurt. This report probably represents a good roadmap for other companies that want to strengthen their business practices and reputation. It is also important to note that the CEO has played a major role in getting the committee's findings infused into the organization.